The Cardiac Kidz – Get Out/Find Yourself A Way 7″

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Too bad the b-side doesn’t live up to the high quality of Get Out. So intense. The bass sound and the way he plays it is just amazing. And what a break after the second chorus!! Hilarious sloppy drumming done the right way. Clocks in on 1:20 which means this is one of the best punk rock you’ll ever here.

By the way, this has to be one of the most amazing sleeves I’ve seen due to the prettiness of these boys. Who shall I choose? I think I’ll go with Steven Lightfoot.

Country: USA
Year: 1979
Label: Lub Dub
Format: 7″
Songs:
Get Out.mp3
Find Yourself A Way.mp3

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104 Responses to The Cardiac Kidz – Get Out/Find Yourself A Way 7″

  1. Pingback: Recent tracks on Killed By Death Records / The Hype Machine

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  4. dylan says:

    YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES
    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! FUCKING AWESOME. thank you for posting this! you bought only the 2nd copy of this ive ever seen, man, this one is tough. a true master piece!!!

  5. mrpoopy says:

    Yes, thanks–I was hoping this would show up one of these days. The moustache always makes the band! I have the live “Play Ground” 7″ which has no info–am I correct to assume it came after this one?

  6. Spraypaint Manifesto says:

    I wonder why a Killed by Moustache compilation hasn’t turned up yet….these guys would definitely make the cut.

  7. Tom says:

    The B-side may not be up to the awesome A-side, but it’s not bad. Thanks for the post!

  8. Steve says:

    awesome! this is when punk was actually still good, you pre-hardcore. A time where you could still dress and look like a hippie or some long haired freak in a 1979 issue of Skateboarder magazine and still be considered a punk. This in my mind was and is still the real punk, before all that hardcore-muscle-skinhead stuff.

  9. Jay Thurston says:

    I agree with Steve, and yes this 7″ is fucking incredible. It’s a shame I didn’t buy it when it came out.

  10. timmythepunk says:

    Agree with Steve and Jay re the true punk sound and attitude, incredible single, nice mix of buzzsaw guitar and bass.Aussie band News had an identical sound on their Chop Chop Chop/ Dirty Lies single (May 78), available on the Murder Punk compilation, those guys also worked independantly, refusing to play established punk venues and even recorded in their loungeroom.

  11. Guy Mandude says:

    It’s alright. Thanks.

    The anti-hardcore sentiment on this site is hilarious, misguided, and somewhat narrow-minded.
    I’ve always felt kind of lucky that I love punk
    and his younger brother hardcore equally. That’s
    just more music for me! Yippee! Hurray!

  12. mrpoopy says:

    You’re preaching to the choir, Guy Mandude, but I think a lot of us were turned off by what hardcore turned into in the late 80’s. On, the flip, it seems like punk has become increasingly effeminate and “sissified” over the years. A scene that was once a magnet for anti-social weirdos has become a magnet for pussies and a kid getting into punk / HC in 2007 would be like a kid being a hippie in 1989. Who fuckin’ cares?

  13. Tom says:

    It just gets better:
    Lightfoot used to live down the street from me and I use to see him at shows all the time. When I saw your post, I thought I’d see what he’s been up to, since I haven’t seen him in about 20 years. From a web search I found the first link below links about a Lennon murder conspiracy by Stephen King/Reagan/Nixon. Now, it could be a different Steve lightfoot, but on the site he writes “That was the big revelation. Two days later I went to the larger San Diego Library”, this in 1980 (The Cardiac Kidz 45 was released in San Diego in 79)
    And I do remember seeing a van, covered with signs regarding the the same Stephen King/Lennon conspiracy theory, in my neighborhood in the mid-80’s.

    Regardless, the Lightfoot I knew seemed like a nice guy when I knew him. Although musically a little uninformed This was the same era when original San Diego bands like the Zeros and Dils, though no longer in San Diego, had set a high standard. I admired his sincerity but his band was pretty clueless. Here’s the links:

    http://www.lennonmurdertruth.com/

    http://home.pacifier.com/~dkossy/lightfoot.html

  14. The Flakes // Drummer says:

    Holy fuck Tom ha ha :)! Thanks for that information. I pray it’s the same Steven here.

  15. ENCPUNK says:

    Last time I went to Taang records in San Diego, they had a copy of this 7″ for $150.00……and an injections 7″also…

  16. Speaking of the Injections, I was roommates with Lou Skum from the Injections (in 1980) and saw him just last December. He had no idea their old demos had been put out on vinyl. His ex-girlfriend from that time was also here along with Bruce Perrault-ex (Bruce was the guitarist). Keep in mind, none of the three had heard the songs in 25 years, though they all sang along!

  17. PrisonWall says:

    Hey Tom,
    I always wondered, is this Lou Skum grabbing the mic and yelling during the beggining of “Beverly Hills” by the circle Jerks on the Decline of western civilization movie?

    Lots of San Diego people are in this movie. The girl getting hit by Lee Ving on stage was called Tracy. And there is this little evil looking guy called Tony looking mighty pissed in one of the scene of the movie. What hapenned to these people?

    I’m a big fan of the Injections. Can you tell us what hapenned to Lou after the break up of the band? Did he play in other bands? Do you think there is any footage of the Injections around? Maybe you remember someone who used to film shows back in the day? And also, is it true that Lou kinda went nuts and moved back with his mother in the early 80’s?

    Thank you in advance

  18. PrisonWall says:

    Speaking of San Diego punk, the X-terminators are over the top in my opinion. Amazing band all the way. Microwave Radiation is a true monster punk song.

  19. Lou never went nuts. that is a rumor that has persisted for years. It was probably started by Jim Wood (you probably know who he is. Check BreakMyFace.com if you don’t. He’s a prick in my book). Contrary to what Wood said, Lou’s perfectly sane, smart and ALWAYS animated.

    After the Injections, he moved to Hoboken, NJ. It was at that time me and him ran into each other again, after losing contact. I ran into him at a bar across the street from where I lived (the Holiday, on St. Marks Pl in the lower east side in NY). After Hoboken, he moved back to Boston, where he still lives. He now has a kid and a girlfriend. There is footage of Lou on video, but it isn’t live. Carl Rusk (who would later be in the Black Diamonds with Ron Silva from the Crawdaddys) had his dad’s reel-to-reel video recorder (before Beta or VHS) at our house a few times, so there’s misc party footage, and skits, on tape. I think Lou might still have them. They’ve never been converted, in case you were wondering. There was one classic called “Frank’s Cab” where Lou plays a cabbie who drives his car off a cliff because he’s sick of listening to people yap in the seat behind him.

    I know he was in Decline, but I forget what part. I heard that “Chico Tony” is dead, from drugs and alcohol. I think I heard that from DT, the singer from the Xterminators. (He lives about a half a mile from me and I see him all the time, most often at the beach during the summer.) Speaking of Tracy: me and my roommates were babysitting Tracy’s daughter the night of that Fear show, so it was kinda funny seeing what she was up to on a night off from playing mom.

    TMI maybe, but you asked…

  20. PrisonWall says:

    Tom,
    Thank you so much for the great stories. This is stuff i like to read. Jim Wood is now in prison for long time. I don’t know him personally, but i can say he put out a few incredible 7″ on his Radioactive label. Xterminators, Injections and Executives are perfect punk rock records. I wonder wholicensed the Injections demo songs to Rave Up records since Lou and Bruce didn’t know about it. Probably Jim Wood, i have the lp and the insert is the Injections story written by Jim himself.

    Too bad Chico Tony died! In the recent American Hardcore documentary, George from Battalion Of Saints is telling about someone in San Diego punching Henry Rollins on the nose making him bleed like a pig. I think he says it was Chico Tony who did it to Henry! San Diego seemed like a wild place to be in the early punk days!

    Cheers and don’t be shy with telling stories if you feel like to.

  21. ENCPUNK says:

    yeah, I remember the skins kicking the crap out of Steve-o (RIP) of the vandals for no reason at all. they bum rushed the stage and pow!!! Weren’t the Wigs from san diego also? I also think that the Penetrators “Stimulation” 7″ is a great piece of San Diego Punk

  22. Re Injections: A couple years ago, I emailed the guy at Rave Up and he said he gave Wood either $500 or $700 (I forget the exact amount) for the tapes (or a copy). Wood did it knowing he could easily track down Lou and Bruce through me.

    He’s a slime ball. The type of guy who’ll stop by for a “visit” and end up ripping something off if you turn your back. (I know, he did to me.) Just a petty fuckin theif.

  23. The Flakes // Drummer says:

    That Wood reminds me of a guy that is going to be featured here in a couple of days.

  24. Freedom Now says:

    Yeah Steve-o was socked up in San Diego and some of the Vandals equipment was stolen, but it was due to some racist comments that were made during the show.

    So it wasnt skinheads that jumped them, as a matter of fact, one of those who joined in on the action later stabbed a skinhead over similar circumstances later on.

  25. BatsO says:

    Freedom now,

    You’re a liar! Clueless moron.

  26. Tony says:

    Gee, what a spirited batch of postings! Back to the Cardiac Kidz 7″, “Get Out” is an amazing song but I think it’s a “happy accident” as I like to call these cases of unintentional KBD greatness. Because to me the flipside, as well as their other EP, are just mediocre and don’t come even remotely close to matching “Get Out”. One song from their 2nd EP was even on a bad KBD volume in like ’99 from a booter that did better in the past but was scraping the barrel on that one (maybe he’ll be reading this post). Plus- look at the front of the sleeve! I’m not talking about “unpunk” the guys look with their moustaches, frizzy hair and horrible clothes. Any DIY punk record that has credits on the sleeve for “Art Direction and Design” and “Printing Direction” is pretty wanker-ish in my book. Because I think it means they were trying to use their DIY single as a “calling card” to try to get a record deal from some bigger label. But their headshots on the front probably ruined that, especially Jim Ryan with that frizzy mess of a hairdo. Hilarious that 90% of people in the 1970’s dressed and looked like this on a daily basis. What a weird time!

  27. BatsO says:

    I prefer the Cardiac Kids look over the clean cut american boys like (Naked Raygun, Chiefs…) and punk by number looking bands (Casualties, Exploited…) anyday. These guys were probably punker than the bands you consider punk. Tom Pig of Poison Idea had a beard and was way punker than Tony in Chicago or Naked Raygun. If you think a punk band should sound or look a specific way, then you are WRONG kid.

    By the way, “Find yourself a way” is splendid melodic punk rock song.

  28. John says:

    Tony,you are stupid.

  29. Tony says:

    Hey John, you’re gonna have to give me something work with as to why I’m stupid or I’m gonna think you’re just calling me stupid because I have a different opinion than you or something simple like that.

  30. Tony says:

    Stuff gets lost in translation all the time with this online communication so damn I guess I have to explain myself now in detail. Um, in 20 years of listening to punk I’ve never thought punk bands have to look a certain way. Jesus, I wear a shirt and tie to work everyday and I probably look like some yuppie (at least that’s what some punk-by-numbers youngsters called me one day on the bus, funny). I’ve never felt a need to “look the part” even before I had the white-collar job so given that I don’t think punk bands have to wear a uniform- if I only listened to punk by uniformed bands then I’d be listening to a lot of boring-ass shit like the Exploited or whoever. Hey man, some of the punkest songs came from bands who didn’t “look the part” like Kriminella Gitarrer who wore some flares on the cover of their almighty 1st 7″ or all these hippified, stoner-looking bands from the 70’s like the Cardiac Kidz. I was just trying to say that bands like the Cardiac Kidz looked goofy with the mainstream funky 70’s clothing and facial hair they were rocking. Jesus.

  31. BatsO says:

    You don’t have to look the part and i don’t give importance to what people look like, but preppies have no place in punk rock either. I rather see people with beard or long hair than into punk who don’t give a shit about looking fresh than some moron who collect punk records and shaves every morning to please their bosses. Being a business manager and a punk don’t comes together, right Tony?

  32. BatsO says:

    don’t go together*

  33. The Flakes // Drummer says:

    “Being a business manager and a punk don’t comes together, right Tony?” ha ha ha that was some of the stupidest thing I’ve read.

  34. Tony says:

    Hey I’ll take it that I’m that moron you’re referring to, BatsO, because I shave every day! [Well, maybe every other day because my skin gets irritated if I shave every single day before going to work. But that’s another story…] And because I wear a shirt and tie that must mean that I work as a business manager for some big, capitalist evil company, right? And maybe you picture that I have an evil boss who carries around a whip and makes sure my hair is cut properly and orders me around all day? Right? Wrong. Ever hear of someone working for a nonprofit company? I know plenty of people who wear a shirt and tie to work everyday but have socially concious jobs, are environmental lawyers, work for civil rights or human rights organizations, etc. Maybe you should broaden your idea of what grown men in their 30’s who are still into punk after all these years with “careers” or regular jobs do for a living before you paint a picture of me in your head. It also sounds like you picture me throwing around money and paying hundreds of dollars for punk records in my collection (maybe right after I’m done crusing around town in my convertible Ferrari). I was spending lots of money on punk records, then why would I be frequenting mp3 blogs all the time to hear stuff for free? It upsets me to spend more than $20 for a punk record, it’s more fun for me to troll around record shows and dollar bins to find stuff for cheap (Headaches 7″ for $3, Now “Fashionplate” 7″ for $1, etc). I think we’re probably more alike that you think. Now let’s hold hands together and sing Kumbaya.

  35. Tony says:

    I had to take a break from writing so I could go shave before work (the boss called me at home early this morning and ordered me to do so). Back to talking about music instead of defending my punk credentials– their was a mention above about the Cheifs– why knock them because they were a clean cut Southern California band (but not as clean cut compared to some other bands, I think)- their “Blues” EP is a whopper of a record as is most of their unreleased stuff like “Hollywest Crisis”. Just blaring guitar and pounding drums. Naked Raygun went to the barber every week to trim their hair and tucked in their shirts but they had some very classic stuff. I’ve been thinking about other “unpunk”, “mainstream”-looking bands from the 70’s who sounded very punk. Like the Pack from Germany- check out the cover of their LP. Yikes! Bad clothes, long hair but one of the punkest LP’s ever. Da Slyme didn’t look the part either with big 70’s beards and whatnot but their double LP is one of the best, most fun punk LP’s of all time. How about a special bunch of postings of stuff like this? I need to just start my own blog I guess…

  36. BatsO says:

    “Being a business manager and a punk don’t comes together, right Tony?” ha ha ha that was some of the stupidest thing I’ve read.

    Peter, I was teasing the kid, i kinda know him personally as i’ve dealt music stuff with him in the past, he was a business manager back then and probably still is. Maybe you felt guilty of a similar situation! Raped Teenagers attempt at being political was so comical, try finding some old interview and laugh your ass off!

  37. BatsO says:

    Tony, stop trying to justify yourself all the time, you sound like someone who cares to much. Da Slyme looked godly punk and had the attitude while other bands like Naked Raygun just looked like a bunch of 80’s pop star, kinda like Depoche Mode. Da Slyme looked like a bunch of guys who totally didn’t care if they looked good or not. And i am curious, what does *looking the part* would be to you? That’s lame! I still prefer the *I don’t give a shit* looking bands like Da Slyme, that the bands who put to much effort on their looks like Nayked Raygun (Who spends to much time looking clean cut and fresh) and Exploited (Who spends even more times in front of the mirror trying to look like a bunch of postcard “punks”). Da Slyme Rules!

  38. BatsO says:

    The Pack had long hair! So what? They look incredible on the cover of their lp, and read the liner notes on the Incognito repress, these guys had the attitude.

  39. Tony says:

    Um, Batso if traded some records or whatever in the past then I’m drawing a blank. Who are you? I’m so done talking about hair and clothes instead of music– the fucking Pack LP rules, the Da Slyme double LP rules, the A-side of this Cardiac Kidz 7″ rules, etc. Wear a fucking potato sack, cut your hair into a mullet, rock a “business manager” outfit, wear a checkered polyester bell bottom suit, put on a leather jacket and spiked hair, grow a beard and long hair down to your ass, a preppie outfit or a goddamn clown outfit on the cover of your record for all I care. Just sound good. Fuck!

  40. behjan says:

    interesting side-note on the 1st CARDIAC KIDZ sleeve:
    the guy who took the photographs is now a dentist in SD but does not remember the band (or doesnt for whatever reason)
    the 2nd CK 7″ (live) has a better version of FIND YOURSELF A WAY imho,btw

  41. Erich says:

    Hahaha, BatsO is definately the punk stylist here. My experience from nearly 30 years of following music and scenes: The more dressed they come, the sooner they go.
    And that will be the last time I even spoke about such topics as style and fashion.

  42. Erich says:

    And Tony hit the nail right on the head when saying this was just a “happy accident”. That is so often the case with late 70s “punk” records. I remember, in the 80s nobody I knew wanted to touch these 7″s – they were considered cheap punk attempts (and besides, HC was the thing for most of us). Looking back now, I still can feel why I didn’t want to have these 7″s (saw this one in many shops in the 80s in the USA) – but thing is, after we’ve grown out of the “scene” thing, we kinda ended up in a similiar place like these bands were in. I consider myself an outsider of the whole music scene thing now, cause it’s a mere obsession. I don’t give a rats ass about style, scene, dos, donts and all that. It’s the music that drives me. So that allows one to reapproach to these 7″s of unpunky punk bands with a new aesthetic. And that’s when you start realizing how great some of these bands were and how weird the times.

  43. The Flakes // Drummer says:

    Damn, if I knew about this record in the 80s I would’ve bought it right away. Strange that there weren’t that many people into HC back then who also listened to and bought the 70s stuff. I found an interview with my old band from 1986 listing current influences: Descendents, 999, The Jam, Deep Wound, Jerry’s Kids, Genesis, Yes, Rush, Minor Threat, Zero Boys, Frank Zappa, Povel Ramel, Black Sabbath and Pagans.

  44. The Flakes // Drummer says:

    “Maybe you felt guilty of a similar situation! Raped Teenagers attempt at being political was so comical, try finding some old interview and laugh your ass off!”
    Not guilty at all :). But I wish I was more of a business man back when. I’ve read some old interviews the latest at sirling.blogg.se and my memory is still fresh from the pretentiousness. But hey we where kids. Thank god we had some twist to it back then.

  45. Anonymous says:

    I bet that these guys were much more punk and a bunch of outsiders than all the 80’s “punk” bands that were featured in MRR. I’d rather hear this than than crap like OD’S or Youth Brigade. The so called “punk” who didn’t understand bands like Cardiac Kids were rick kids to concerned by looking “the part” and follow the rules of the “MRR” scene.

    Bands like Electric Eels, Pagans,Lewd…could destroy any of the lame micro-political bands that were worshipped in MRR.

    If you want a happy accident, then look at Lee from Napalm Death, or ENT.

  46. Anonymous says:

    Hardcore was the lame attempt at punk!

  47. Tony says:

    Genesis as an influence- yikes! But being a “business manager” I am only allowed to listen to Genesis or Phil Collins I suppose. Or Kenny G. Erich’s post above made me think back to the 80’s too. I was so into hardcore in the late 80’s that pre-HC punk stuff from the late 70’s seemed like ancient history or “outdated” music that was played too slow and therefore not “modern” to my teenaged mind. I hate to think of the now-expensive KBD records I probably passed up in dollar bins back in the late 80’s or early 90’s. Boo fucking hoo…

  48. Tony says:

    Man, Behjan Mirhadi surfaces again in the Comments section! I haven’t chatted with him in years. How are you Behjan?

  49. The Flakes // Drummer says:

    Dear Anonymous, I’ll remove your comments. If you got something to say to Erich go to his blog.

    I think it was different for us who got into punk in the 70s then followed the progression into HC. It was all the same kind of music played at different speed.

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